Politics of Muslim Societies

A symposium
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Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies Marston Road, Oxford
Open to the public
This event is free to attend - registration is not required
06
May 2022
Conference

Oxford Handbook on Politics in Muslim SocietiesThis one-day symposium includes two roundtables on the politics of Muslim societies to mark the publication of the Oxford Handbook of Politics in Muslim Societies. The event will include two invited roundtables interspersed with a public event at lunchtime. Each roundtable will revolve around three core questions (see below). Editors of the Oxford Handbook will offer introductory remarks to frame the discussion along with one of the local hosts. The panellists will focus on applying these questions to relevant outcomes: political outcomes (Roundtable I) and socio-economic dimensions (Roundtable II).

Political outcomes include regime type, political behaviour/voting, and social mobilisation (Chapters in Part I, II, and III)

Social and economic outcomes include social welfare, economic development and governance (Chapters in Part IV, V, and VI)

The symposium is co-organised by the Research Cluster on Economic and Human Development in Muslim Societies, Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies and the Blavatnik School of Government.

Please note registration is not required.

Core questions for the two roundtables

  • What are the most important departures from the existing literature?
  • What is the value-added of our (re-)conceptualisation of religion? What analytical leverage (if any) does it provide?
  • What does religion (as we define it) explain and what does it not explain? Why does this matter?

Symposium programme

Time Event Venue 
9:10 am – 9:15 am Welcome remarks by Dr Farhan Ahmed Nizami, Director, Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies Cordoba Room
9:15 am – 11:15 am

Roundtable I: Politics of Muslim Societies: What’s religion got to do with it?

Introductory remarks by:

Melani Cammett, Harvard University

Pauline Jones, University of Michigan

Maya Tudor, University of Oxford

Invited contributors: Ben Ansell (DPIR/Nuffield College) | Neil Ketchley (Politics and International Relations/Oxford University) | Masooda Bano (Development Studies/Oxford University) | Raphael Lefevre (Oxford University) | Mohammad Talib (Anthropology/ISCA and Islamic Studies)| Michael Willis (Middle Eastern Studies/St Antony’s)

Cordoba Room
11:15 am – 11:45 am Coffee break

Malaysia Foyer

11:45 am – 1:15 pm

Public launch of the Oxford Handbook of Politics of Muslim Societies

Q&A Session with Melani Cammett and Pauline Jones

Jerusalem Room
1:30 pm – 2:30 pm Lunch Oman Hall
2:30 pm – 4:00 pm Roundtable II: Islam, Politics, and Development

Introductory remarks by:

Melani Cammett, Harvard University

Pauline Jones, University of Michigan

Adeel Malik, OCIS & University of Oxford

This roundtable will broach the three core questions set out above in the context of key socioeconomic outcomes, including social welfare, economic development and governance (Chapters in Part IV, V, and VI of the Oxford Handbook)

Invited contributors: Ben Ansell (DPIR/Nuffield College) | Max Gallien (Institute of Development Studies, Sussex University) | Steffen Hertog (LSE) | Ashrakat Elshehawy (Oxford University) |Tugba Bozcan (Kings College London) | Yasser Kureishi (Law faculty and Trinity College)

Cordoba Room